2013 AQ Conference Profiles: Atlantic Coast Conference

 

ACC-header

BCS Know How will take you through the six automatic-qualifying BCS conferences in preparation for the 2013 season. Short and sweet previews keep going with the expanded ACC. Scroll down to see our profiles of the other conferences.

Conference: Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC)

Active Since: 1953

Current Member Schools:

Atlantic Conference: Boston College Eagles, Clemson Tigers, Florida State Seminoles, Maryland Terrapins, NC State Wolfpack, Syracuse Orange, Wake Forest Demon Deacons
Coastal Conference: Duke Blue Devils, Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, Miami Hurricanes, North Carolina Tar Heels, Pittsburgh Panthers, Virginia Cavaliers, Virginia Tech Hokies (14)

2013 Bowl Affiliations and Tie-Ins: Orange Bowl (BCS), Military Bowl, Belk Bowl, Russell Athletic Bowl, Music City Bowl, AdvoCare V100 Bowl, Sun Bowl, Chick-fil-A Bowl (8)

2012 Results:
Conference Champion — Florida State Seminoles (12-2, 7-1)
Conference Runner-up — Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets (7-7, 5-3)
BCS Bowl Results: 2013 Orange Bowl: Florida State 31 vs. Northern Illinois 10
Overall Bowl Record: 4-2

2013 Heisman Hopefuls: Miami RB Duke Johnson, Miami QB Stephen Morris, Clemson QB Tajh Boyd, Clemson WR Sammy Watkins

BCS Know How’s 2013 Predictions:
Conference Champion — Clemson Tigers
Conference Runner-up — Florida State Seminoles
BCS Bids — Clemson — Orange Bowl
Heisman Finalists: None

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2012 BCS AQ Conference Profile: Atlantic Coast Conference

BCS Know How will take you through the six automatic-qualifying BCS conferences in preparation for the 2012 season. Short and sweet previews begin with the ACC. Scroll down to see our profiles of the other conferences.

Conference: Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC)

Active Since: 1953

Current Member Schools:

Atlantic Division: Boston College Eagles, Clemson Tigers, Florida State Seminoles, Maryland Terrapins, North Carolina State Wolfpack, Wake Forest Demon Deacons
Coastal Division: Duke Blue Devils, Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, Miami (Fla.) Hurricanes, North Carolina Tar Heels, Virginia Cavaliers, Virginia Tech Hokies (12)

Bowl Affiliations: Orange Bowl (BCS), Military Bowl, Belk Bowl, Independence Bowl, Russell Athletic Bowl, Music City Bowl, Sun Bowl, Chick-fil-A Bowl (8)

2011 Results:
Conference Champion — Clemson Tigers (10-4, 6-2, Coastal Division Champion)
Conference Runner-up — Virginia Tech Hokies (11-3, 7-1, Atlantic Division Champion)
BCS Bowl Results: 2012 Orange Bowl: West Virginia 70 vs. Clemson 33; 2012 Sugar Bowl: Michigan 23 vs. Virginia Tech 20
Overall Bowl Record: 2-6

2012 Outlook: Up, down and up again, Clemson spent the early part of the 2011 season as a top-10 team. Stumbles mid-season broke any chance of a national title shot for the Tigers, but a Clemson ACC championship game victory over Virginia Tech brought the ACC two BCS bids for the first time in conference history.

With an unparalleled season in that respect in the review mirror, can the ACC again deliver top-flight talent on a national stage? The pieces seem in place, as Florida State — BCS bowl-less since 2006 — is a preseason top-10 team and the consistent Hokies figure to play a role in the national discussion somewhere down the line.

A conference that hasn’t participated in the BCS title game since 2003 may have a shot with the Seminoles in 2012. but a so0n-to-be-outdated BCS title shot or not, the ACC is certainly a force to reckon with.

Heisman Hopefuls: Clemson QB Tajh Boyd, Clemson WR Sammy Watkins, Virginia Tech QB Logan Thomas; North Carolina RB Giovani Bernard; Florida State QB E.J. Manuel

BCS Know How’s 2012 Predictions:
Conference Champion — Florida State Seminoles
Conference Runner-up — Virginia Tech Hokies
BCS Bids — Florida State — Orange Bowl
Heisman Finalists: None

BCS Commissioners Head to Chicago to Hammer Out BCS Playoff Fate

When the 11 BCS conference commissioners and Notre Dame’s athletic director gather Wednesday in Chicago, the whole of college football will have its collective eyes trained on the Windy City.

This first of two meetings serves as the most important benchmark yet in the BCS’s already ticking death clock. The 12 gathered in Chicago will be tasked with compromising on what will become its replacement — a four-team playoff. In April, this same group felt strongly enough about the prospect of a four-team format that it formally introduced it as a recommendation to its member conferences and schools.

Having discussed the proposals among the athletic directors and presidents within, the 12 will now come together to finalize a playoff plan, the first major structural change to the college football postseason since the BCS replaced the Bowl Alliance in 1998.

And perhaps more fascinatingly, the 2014 season will see the most drastic change to the overall landscape of college football since the now renamed Divisions I, II and III were created in 1973.

In one of the Hilton Chicago O’Hare Airport’s 42 conference rooms, college football will change, and probably for the better. But what is left to discuss? And why do they hold all of these meetings in airport hotels?

Among the most important decisions are these (we’ve broken these down more extensively here):

  • How do we choose the teams?
  • What teams even qualify for the system?
  • Where should we play the games?
  • What’s Notre Dame’s relationship with the BCS? The other independent schools?
  • When are we playing these games?

But the thing that might be on the minds of these 12 not-angry-but-certainly-perturbed men is how their own conference (or school in Notre Dame’s case) can best benefit from a playoff. It’s no mystery that the BCS has been unkind to some of the players who will sit at that conference table. Certainly, the Big Ten’s Jim Delany and the SEC’s Mike Slive will have much to say in this regard. So too will interim Big East commissioner Jim Bailey, who will certainly look to deflect any proposal that includes the words “selection committee.”

For easy reference, we’ve broken down each conference, with the mindset with which each will likely enter these pivotal meetings.

ACC: Conference commissioner John Swofford has long been in favor of changing the status quo in college football, and will likely be a vocal participant in these two important meetings. The conference will likely stand for preferential consideration given to conference champions, with certain criteria dictating the selection of participants, but might agree with a selection committee format.

Big East: A perceived weak link in the BCS equation, the Big East is ready to make its voice heard at these meetings, but how do they get that done? Bailey is likely to push for a conference champion-only system, but likely vehemently against a selection committee, which would — in the minds of the Big East member schools — stand to pass them over every time.

Big 12: Faced with the torment of Oklahoma State being left out of the BCS last season, the Big 12 favors a selection committee to pick the four teams for a playoff. The conference is also understandably with the SEC in believing in a “best-four” as opposed to just “top-four,” and would want that committee to not be restricted to picking conference champions only.

Big Ten: The tradition of the Rose Bowl dictates much of the Big Ten’s choices coming into the meetings. Commissioner Jim Delany and the conference would most be in favor of a “plus-one” format, but in light of the almost certainty of a four-team playoff, the conference would be in favor of a transparent selection committee that values conference champions, but is not exclusive to them. The conference has been less than committal on any one line of thought.

Pac-12: Like the Big Ten, the added weight of the Rose Bowl dictates much of commissioner Larry Scott’s lines of thought. Scott has even gone as far to suggest the recently announced SEC-Big 12 Champions Bowl agreement puts the “plus-one” back on the table. Scott, too, however, recognizes the undeniable push toward a four-team system. He and the conference will likely support a system that favors conference champions. Scott is on record as believing committees to select such a playoff would be too subjective.

SEC: “1-2-3-4” would be the motto of the Southeastern Conference. Home to the last six BCS champions, the SEC is understandably set in its ways. Not in favor of a selection committee, just the four best teams in a playoff with no conference championship requirement, even if those are all SEC squads. They could be convinced a selection committee is necessary at these meetings, but would be fine to go without one.

Non-AQ conferences: The conferences have long called for changes, and will be in the camp of the Big Ten, in favor of a selection committee that likely favors conference champions, but does not require it of them. Teams from the MWC like TCU, Boise State or Utah would have likely benefitted from that model in the past.

Notre Dame: Say what you will about one school having so much say at the table, but the Fighting Irish will certainly not go down without a fight to preserve the chance that they can get into the playoff without having a conference of their own to win. They are happy with the playoff idea, so long as they can qualify for it. 

Sources:

ACC [1, 2]
Big East [1]
Big Ten [1,2, 3]
Big 12 [1,2]
Pac-12 [1]
SEC [1, 2]
Non-AQs [1]
Overall [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

2011 BCS AQ Conference Profiles: Atlantic Coast Conference

Welcome to the 2011 college football season! BCS Know How will be taking you through the six automatic-qualifying BCS conferences and five non-AQ conferences with profiles of each conference. We begin with the ACC. Scroll down to see our profiles of the other 10 conferences.

Conference: Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC)

Active Since: 1953

Current Member Schools:

Atlantic Division: Boston College Eagles, Clemson Tigers, Florida State Seminoles, Maryland Terrapins, North Carolina State Wolfpack, Wake Forest Demon Deacons.
Coastal Division: Duke Blue Devils, Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, Miami (Fl.) Hurricanes, North Carolina Tar Heels, Virginia Cavaliers, Virginia Tech Hokies. (12)

Bowl Affiliations: Orange Bowl (BCS), Independence Bowl, Belk Bowl, Military Bowl, Champs Sports Bowl, Music City Bowl, Sun Bowl, Chick-fil-A Bowl (8)

2010 Results:
Conference Champion – Virginia Tech Hokies (11-3, 8-0, Coastal Division Champion)
Conference Runner-up – Florida State Seminoles (10-4, 6-2, Atlantic Division Champion)
BCS Bowl Result: 2011 Orange Bowl: Stanford 40 vs. Virginia Tech 12
Overall Bowl Record: 4-5

2011 Outlook: A consistently strong conference, the ACC delivers each year with talent from top to bottom.

2011 seems to be no different, as resurgent Miami, NC State, North Carolina and Boston College join the ranks of recent powers Virginia Tech, Florida State and Georgia Tech as legitimate contender’s for the conference’s BCS bid.

Can Virginia Tech make it two conference championships in a row, or will Florida State take that next step? Or could it be any of the handful of other teams seemingly on their way up?

Heisman Hopefuls: Virginia Tech RB David Wilson, Maryland QB Danny O’Brien, Florida State QB E.J. Manuel

BCS Know How’s 2011 Predictions:
Conference Champion – Florida State Seminoles
Conference Runner-up – Virginia Tech Hokies
BCS Bids – Florida State – Orange Bowl
Heisman Finalists: None